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Letters to the Editor


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POSTED: Thursday, September 10, 2009

Put politicians under care plan

With all the controversy surrounding President Barack Obama's health care plan, I have a simple solution: Have all the Washington politicians, including Obama, fall under the plan proposed for the people. Doing that will ensure a fair plan for sure.

And while we're at it, if the Washington politicians fell under the Social Security system, instead of their cushy retirement plan, Social Security would never be in jeopardy.

Hesh Goldstein

“;Health Talk”; radio moderator, Honolulu

 

               

     

 

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School's probe not reassuring

When two 13-year-old boys have been accused of having nonconsensual sex with a 12-year-old girl against her will, keeping her a virtual prisoner over more than two days, it is disturbing that Kamehameha Schools would pass the buck when it comes to calling in the police by saying: “;We rely on parents to file criminal complaints on behalf of the children.”;

I suspect that the parents of the offenders have very deep pockets and have in the past contributed heavily to the school's coffers and might contribute even more, especially if this atrocity is whitewashed.

If there is such a double standard at Kamehameha Schools, it should be remedied immediately because such a reluctance to offend rich parents cannot help but encourage other students with well-heeled parents to commit copycat crimes, and one 12-year-old girl horribly traumatized for life is already one girl too many.

In light of the school's obvious reluctance to call the police on its own, its spokeswoman saying that the school has launched its own internal investigation somehow does not make me feel any better.

David Yasuo Henna

McCully

 

Government not always bad thing

Our history proves we, the people, are afraid of change, even if it's for, morally, a better stance.

People feared freeing the slaves so much they fought a war against their own brothers and sisters. People feared desegregation so much we jailed pacifists.

Now, people fear giving 50 million of their fellow Americans health care because they believe our government will somehow turn into an evil, controlling medical monster?

Government intervention is good, too. When you call 911, whom are you calling? The government. You don't fear the city's paramedics when they come to your aid. You don't fear the police visiting after your house has been broken into. You don't fear the firefighter entering your house ablaze to save your child. You didn't fear the U.S. armed forces when they defended Pearl Harbor on Dec. 7, 1941.

Government did good then, and can do good now.

It's our duty to be skeptical, but we citizens make up the government—so be vigilant and criticize when we do bad, but also have faith in we, the people, to do good. Single-payer universal care can be that good.

Gerald Penaflor

Kapolei

 

Is it legal to raid a rainy day fund?

I have been hearing a lot of talk about raiding the hurricane fund to help with the budget shortfall. I was wondering how the state can raid it. Wasn't the fund created for homeowners who needed hurricane insurance coverage who could not get any? Couldn't all the people who paid into the fund sue the state, if it raids the fund to fix the budget shortfall?

Jeffrey Yamamoto

Honolulu