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Friday, November 14, 2003





Other areas will get curbside recycling, too

Although the letter from Johnnie-Mae Perry of Waianae in Sunday's Star-Bulletin appeared critical of the city for selecting Mililani, rather than Waianae, for the pilot curbside recycling program, I am encouraged that Waianae is ready to recycle -- and with enthusiasm, according to Perry.

Once we work through the nuts and bolts of the program's operation with Mililani, we hope to be ready to roll it out islandwide beginning in July 2004. That's just around the corner, Waianae. ... and Waimanalo, Kaneohe, Hawaii Kai, Hauula, Kalihi, Kahuku and Haleiwa. We've heard from all of you with enthusiasm. Mahalo. It's going to take all of us working together to truly be able to increase recycling and reduce waste on our island.

Suzanne Jones
Recycling coordinator, Department of Environmental Services
City & County of Honolulu

Don't rush to judge Hokulia developer

Every step of the way for the past decade, 1250 Oceanside Partners obtained government permits and approvals for the Hokulia project. The Land Use Commission was kept apprised of the plans. There were many opportunities for public comment, and yet nobody stepped forward asking Oceanside to seek other avenues of approval.

Some letter writers have resorted to personal attacks, portraying the developer as a reckless gambler. Don't believe the notion that a well-respected land development firm, in business for 30 years, would carelessly roll the dice on a $350 million investment and risk jeopardizing its relationships with its investors, the buyers of its product, its employees and the community in which it wants to conduct business for the long term. That is nonsense.

Many of the accusations against the developer are blatantly false. Each of us should become fully informed about Hokulia before rushing to judgment. Many well-meaning people have written letters to the editor about preserving the environment and agricultural lands. While these are worthy goals, have any of these people visited Hokulia and learned the complete story of what has been done to address these issues? It might surprise a lot of people to see how exemplary this developer has been with respect to Hawaiian culture, the environment and a viable agricultural plan.

Now the substantial potential benefits of this development are in question. Many Hawaiian families are soon to be without a source of income. Where is the justice in any of this?

Steve Dunn
Keauhou, Hawaii

Schools' spin control is getting tedious

Kamehameha Schools' scandals have developed their own predictable cycle. Public exposure of bad conduct is quickly followed by stonewalling, frantic efforts at spin control, cutting a few people loose, pious affirmation of "Pauahi's values," hiring more experts and consultants, whining about the media picking on poor Kamehameha Schools and so on.

The only piece missing from the latest fiasco is for his fellow trustees to find Nainoa Thompson, dry him off, wind him up and put him in front of the TV cameras for a passionate speech before he vanishes once again.

Is anyone else tired of seeing this same movie?

Jay Harvey
Honolulu

Driver took advantage of Japanese visitor

My Japanese friend felt like he was treated unfairly while taking a taxi from the Honolulu airport.

While visiting the islands, he wanted to see the Mormon temple in Laie on the North Shore. He hired a taxi from the Honolulu airport and was quoted a price of $70 dollars. He also was worried about his luggage costing extra but the driver reassured him that it would be OK.

During the drive to Laie, my friend noticed that they were not taking the most direct route. The driver made no comment, but kept going on what my friend called "the long, windy way around."

When they arrived in Laie the taxi driver said the fare was $170. My friend thought the driver was dishonest, but was not sure what he could do about it. He believes this kind of treatment of Japanese tourists is common. He did pay the fare and hopes that in the future tourists will be treated fairly and honestly. After all, these loving people contribute to our economy.

Ritchie Kiyabu
Laie

City can't lose money it never deserved

I take exception to the implication that the bus pass lawsuit is responsible for a potential loss to the city of $650,000 ("Judge puts the brakes on bus pass changes," Star-Bulletin, Nov. 8). In a free society and open court, an illegal action, such as canceling the passes, has no potential.

City attorney Gregory Swartz was quoted as saying "chaos" could ensue. What about the future widespread chaos if the government is free to disregard its commitments whenever it wants something?

As for the $650,000, I seem to recall a news item indicating that some $1 million was saved as a result of not having to pay the drivers during the transit strike. In addition, the new, five-year contract does not call for pay raises until the last two years. Riders will have purchased new passes long before then. Any rise in insurance plans will be the lesser and general maintenance would have been necessary in any case.

Charles Luce
Honolulu


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[ BRAINSTORM! ]


Historical markers?

Other cities have permanent markers signifying historic sites or locations. Shouldn't Hawaii be equally accommodating to students and visitors? What should such markers look like in Honolulu? Design one! Remember, markers on walls require the owner's permission, but markers in the sidewalk belong to the city.


Send your ideas, drawings and solutions by Thursday, November 13 to:

brainstorm@starbulletin.com

Or mail them to:
Brainstorm!
c/o Burl Burlingame
Star-Bulletin
500 Ala Moana
7 Waterfront Plaza, Suite 210
Honolulu, Hawaii 96813

Fax:
Brainstorm!
c/o Burl Burlingame
529-4750


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How to write us

The Star-Bulletin welcomes letters that are crisp and to the point (150 to 200 words). The Star-Bulletin reserves the right to edit letters for clarity and length. Please direct comments to the issues; personal attacks will not be published. Letters must be signed and include a daytime telephone number.

Letter form: Online form, click here
E-mail: letters@starbulletin.com
Fax: (808) 529-4750
Mail: Letters to the Editor, Honolulu Star-Bulletin, 7 Waterfront Plaza, 500 Ala Moana, Suite 210, Honolulu, HI 96813




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